Friday, April 3, 2009

bridge to the past

This little stone bridge is tucked away in the shadows off of Upper Dummerston Road.
If you climb the steps and cross over you find yourself suddenly without a clear path to follow.
Once it must have led to a homestead.
Now there is only a forest floor strewn with leaves.

15 comments:

Jacob said...

Omigod! Not only stone fences but stone walkways...fantastic, beautiful!

One could write a novel from just this picture.

Cezar and Léia said...

Lovely stones!Your picture is perfect!Can you remember some Hobin Hood stories!:-)
Kind Regards
Léia

Abe Lincoln said...

This is a nice looking bridge. Looks to be hand built too.

We had thunderstorms last night and lots of rain and lightening.

Birdman said...

I like this one. Love how it just meanders along--- Near the Long Trail?

frenchie4moi said...

I have these same stones in my garden...wish I had this as well! TGIF!!

Martin Langeveld said...

Isn't this bridge part of the Retreat trails system? I believe Retreat patients built the stone tower, higher up, stone steps where needed, and several of these stone landscape features.

Keith said...

Cold Spring (1845)
This spring is located just west of Upper Dummerston Road where it joins Route 30. A source of pure water, it was the destination of daily walks by patrons of Dr. Wesselhoeft's Hydropathic Institution, located in Brattleboro. In 1899 the Retreat built a stone hood over the spring and a rustic bridge of boulders over the ravine. It became a favorite resting place for Retreat patients on their daily walks.

brattcat said...

Martin and Keith, how wonderful to get such informative comments. Thank you for visiting and thank you for filling in my gaps. The water under the stone hood didn't look very pure the other day but looks can be deceiving ( :
Leia, oh yes, I remember the Robin Hood story. Does this suggest Sherwood Forest to you?
Birdman, see the comments of Martin and Keith below. We're a good ways off from the Long Trail here.

Clueless in Boston said...

Very nice looking stone path and bridge.

Julie said...

So good when visitors are interested enough to provide detail and detail that adds such humanity to the image.

Finding little reminders of previous times is a delight, isn't it? I like to be linked with those who came before, not in some big historic way, but just in little people going about their life much in the way that I go about my life. Gives such continuity and meaning ...

Elenka said...

I like this one, too. Interesting that it leads to nowhere. Kinda sad.

Julie ScottsdaleDailyPhoto.com said...

such a nice capture but a bridge to nowhere. it obviously at one time went to a very lovely and charming home. it is so quaint it had to have a romantic, happy story at the end of the bridge. In answer to your question, I cannot live without Chihuly for quite some time so I will be spreading my Chihuly photos over the summer but it is going to be really sad when the glass art exhibit goes away.. I will have Chihuly withdrawals. I have gone out there over a dozen times to photograph it.

JM said...

This is so cool! What a lovely little bridge!
It seems we both have chosen stone work to post today! :-)

Hilda said...

It's a beautiful stone wall and I'm actually kind of happy that it now leads nowhere in particular. I like it when nature takes back what humans have used :)

slim said...

This is community blogging at its very best! How wonderful to have the gaps filled in about this storybook image within hours of posting it. Did you already share the stone tower that Martin mentions?