Friday, March 30, 2012

a masterpiece in stone

dividing two side-yards on frost street.

17 comments:

Cezar and Léia said...

I got many ideas with your post, you are so creative, I love the way that you play with our imagination, thanks so much! :)
Léia

Malyss said...

In south of France, we have along tradition of such stone walls. As they were built without cement , we used to call them "dry walls".

Carraol said...

Magnificent pieces, are they a wink of Eternity?

cieldequimper said...

Just like a rugged coast.

Doug Hickok said...

I love real stone, and what a great idea on how to use it creatively. Have a nice weekend Brattcats!

Cathy Hudspeth said...

How unique! I've never seen anything like it.

Lowell said...

That one pile of stones looks positively dangerous. Wouldn't even need a guard dog. Yikes!

PerthDailyPhoto said...

I've seen walls like this here too, like Malyss we call them dry walls, beautifully shown details Brattcat.

Sharon said...

Very rugged looking.

Virginia said...

What an interesting way to use the stone. Only your eye would find this composition. Lovely.
V

Birdman said...

Art mostly is not found in museums.

Bob Crowe said...

I had to click that one for a better view. The geometry and engineering is amazing and it's done on the fly. What's the spherical thing on the lower right? Looks like a light bulb got stuck in there.

JM said...

This is beautiful! Stone walls are very common here, but those made of vulcanic rock to shelter the vines in the Azores Islands are the most famous and have even been classified by UNESCO. Have a look: http://clubevinhosportugueses.wordpress.com/2010/09/09/vinhas-do-pico-paisagem-patrimonio-mundial-da-humanidade-pela-unesco/

Sharon Creech said...

How I love stone walls - and to wonder who placed each stone - and to marvel at the artistry. xx

Jilly said...

Love this. Each piece looks as if it belongs exactly where it is.

VP said...

You are absolutely right: this is a rare masterpiece!

Irina said...

Ahhh, amazing photo!